July 18, 2014

Gulf #gulfproject #flyozone #emeraldcoastppg #louisiana #wetlands #landloss #gulfcoast #neworleans #paragliding

July 9, 2014

Coming soon: #gulfproject | #wetlands #landloss #Louisiana #photography #gulfcoast #emeraldcoastppg #flyozone #swamp #landscape #erosion #paragliding

July 7, 2014
Guantánamo Bay Is the Most Ridiculous Place on Earth

Newsweek writer Alexander Nazaryan and I traveled to GTMO for a surreal week scuba diving with amputee veterans, drinking at an Irish pub, and visiting detention centers that were totally off-limits to my camera. 

Alexander writes, “Guantánamo Bay is a warped American dream, a caliginous sliver of our imperial legacy soothed by the gentle lapping of the Caribbean Sea. A refrain you often hear from the Americans on base is that it is incredibly safe at Guantánamo Bay, especially for children, who can roam here as they presumably no longer can in the United States, which is awash in the depredations of sexual predators and drug fiends and Justin Bieber’s posse. Life’s irenic rhythms are apparently not threatened by the 154 men imprisoned at the detention camp just over the hill from the W.T. Sampson Elementary School, a few of whom stand legitimately accused of trying to kill Americans through various acts of terror.” (Read his full story here)

July 7, 2014
The Sinkhole That’s Eating Lousiana

Now based in New Orleans, I’m back online after several months hiatus. This is a film I recently shot and produced with Storyhunter for Newsweek on one of many of Louisiana’s ecological crises. Check out the accompanying story by Alexander Nazaryan here.  

June 1, 2014

Shot while on a video assignment in Ecuador for Groundswell International. 

April 20, 2014
Tarnished: The True Cost of Gold

Pulitzer Center for Crisis Reporting has produced an ebook that examines gold mining around the world featuring my work and that of 10 other writers and photographers. 

You can download the ebook here.

"Mining for gold is dangerous business, from injury and drowning to mercury poisoning and lung damage. Here are portraits of people whose way of life is threatened and who are fighting back—a miner who calls for fair trade and fair mine certification, “a modern-minded mayor who takes a stand against modern mining,” a Romanian farmer-philosopher.

Children as young as four haul buckets of water and smash boulders. Activist farmers stage roadblocks to protest the foreign takeover of a local mine. Indigenous peoples are displaced and environments despoiled. All of this in the service of gold—the lustrous, coveted symbol of wealth that is too often borne of poverty, danger and disease.

Eleven journalists traveled to 10 countries, from Peru to the Philippines, to tell these stories.”

January 15, 2014
Pepe in Neon Magazine

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Paolo Woods and I photographed this story on the used clothing market in Haiti. The story is distributed by Institute. Click here to see the full set of images. 

text by -Arnaud Robert

Port au Prince’s Fifth Avenue is a waterfront road, just off the harbor, where mountains of second hand clothes bake in the tropical sun. The market, Croix-des-Bossales, is where the slaves used to be sold. Now it is not strong men from Africa that the merchants receive, but containers loaded with skirts, pants and shirts from the US. These second-hand garments are called “Pepe” and it is increasingly difficult to see a Haitian wearing something that has not been previously worn by an American.

A t-shirt produced for Wal-Mart in the sweatshops of Port au Prince will be sported by a Texan and then returned to the sender, who, at last, will be able to wear it. This back and forth gives us a peek into the workings of the globalization of the textile industry.

The majority of “Pepe” that arrive on the island have been donated by Americans to charities and collection centers, rejected by Thrift shops, and have gone through the sorting warehouses run by Haitians in Miami that discard the winter clothes and other unmarketable items from the lot. But the worst T-shirts, those that would barely be sold in the cheap gift shops of Times Square, those with the dumbest slogans, reappear, thanks to a free-market miracle, in remote provinces of Haiti where nobody has taken the effort of translating such poetry into Creole. 

It is said that the T-shirt, along with the bumper sticker, is America’s favorite place for self-expression, a kind of personal billboard, where political, philosophical and religious beliefs are condensed. Paolo Woods and Ben Depp, two photographers living in Haiti, went on the hunt for the perfect T-shirt.

All of this would be amusing and ironic if the “Pepe” trade had not put out of business thousands of Haitian tailors. But little can stem this garment flow if not the economic crisis that has made Americans a little more cautious about “popping tags”.

“Pepe”, or how lousy T-shirts exemplify fifty years of a North-South relationship.

October 31, 2013
How You Pay Farmers to Watch Their Crop Shrivel Up and Die

The federal crop insurance program puts farmers in a real bind. And as climate change intensifies, it’s only getting worse.

I shot this story recently with support from the awesome Midwest Center for Investigative Reporting

October 31, 2013
Repost from photoshelter blog

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Here at the PhotoShelter office, we see a lot of awe-inspiring photography from our members all the time. Don’t think this goes unnoticed! We keep tabs on the work we love, email photos around that we find inspiring, and feature those we believe are making a difference with their work. The talent that we see keeps us motivated to do our best everyday.

Photo by Ben Depp - featured in our first Selects email

Photo by Ben Depp – featured in our first Selects email

We wanted a way to share with everyone who appreciates a good photograph the talent that exists in the PhotoShelter community, and so we began creating the idea of Selects. Selects is a bi-weekly email showcasing awesome imagery from PhotoShelter members. Selects was created with photo editors and photographers in mind – so sign up to discover new talent, get inspired for your own shoots, or simply see something new right in your inbox.

Moving forward, we’ll feature work we come across as well as images our members submit.  Find out how to submit your images here.

And, opt-in today to begin receiving Selects!

July 10, 2013
http://www.buzzfeed.com/copyranter/poor-haitians-wearing-racy-t-shirts-donated-by-americans

Here’s a story Paolo Woods and I worked on. It’s supposed to be a funny look at our sad global economy, not another poor sad Haiti story, but unfortunately headlines are beyond photographers’ control.

March 11, 2013
Haiti’s Atis Rezistans (Resistance Artists)

March 7, 2013
Fun to have a photo on this nice-looking poster for a #Haiti forum at #DukeUniversity. Thanks @clairepayton.

Fun to have a photo on this nice-looking poster for a #Haiti forum at #DukeUniversity. Thanks @clairepayton.

January 13, 2013

A slideshow of my photos published on Foreign Policy with a great story by @TheOChronicle about the US farm bill & Haitian & Arkansas rice farmers. 
Before going up in a crop duster to shoot photos, I ate a pile of bacon and a large coffee from a gas station. I was sick within a couple minutes of takeoff but managed to avoid losing my classy breakfast until after we landed.  

A slideshow of my photos published on Foreign Policy with a great story by @TheOChronicle about the US farm bill & Haitian & Arkansas rice farmers. 

Before going up in a crop duster to shoot photos, I ate a pile of bacon and a large coffee from a gas station. I was sick within a couple minutes of takeoff but managed to avoid losing my classy breakfast until after we landed.  

January 13, 2013
Outside Magazine: Trying to Help in Haiti

Not only was I assigned to photograph this story, but I ended up a character in Jonah Ogles’ feature on child sponsorship in Haiti. Read the story here

December 18, 2012

Twins, solar lamps & chickens #Haiti - highlights from an Air Canada Foundation assignment last week.